“Learning to Walk My Talk: How Quantum Biology Changed My Life” with Bruce Lipton

by Terry Patten

I’m delighted to announce that I will be joined on Thursday, July 24th (not at our usual time — note this will be at 5 PM Pacific) by the remarkable biologist, author and speaker Bruce Lipton for a conversation we’ve titled Learning to Walk My Talk: How Quantum Biology Changed My Life”.

I had the opportunity to sit and talk with Bruce before, and a few days after, he finished a in-person speaking event (packed with over 200 people, rousing, and highly inspiring) in Oakland, California last week. We talked about many things, but I was particularly struck by his personal story—of how he, essentially, learned to “walk his talk”.

As a cell biologist who participated in some of the experiments whose implications gave birth to the emergence of epigenetics, Bruce was one of the first people to realize that science was emphatically disproving a mechanistic view of life. The “brain” of the cell, he found, is not in the nucleus but in the membrane, and it is largely responding to the condition of the cell environment.

As he got deeper and deeper into the science, he realized that many factors can have big effects on the state of the field environment in which living cells operate. Most significantly, he saw that our subconscious attitudes and beliefs have enormous effects.

To Bruce, grounded in a strictly materialistic paradigm, this was an earth-shaking insight. And he soon discovered that there was no way he would be permitted to pursue its implications within his role as a tenured professor in the medical school at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. So he resigned, and began speaking about it.

That was the beginning of him changing his thinking, or his “talk”. But very soon, he was forced to confront the fact that his life didn’t reflect the revolutionary implications of his scientific insights. This led him to a dramatic moment — an epiphany in whichhis heart opened, and his mental insights began to become the basis for his very way of living his life, moment-to-moment.

Bruce is an enormously loving, happy, charming man—a tremendously compelling and enjoyable speaker. How did he get that way? I realized, THIS is what interested me the most, and what I think most Beyond Awakening listeners will find most useful.

So I suggested that we make this the theme of our conversation — how Bruce began to “walk his talk”, and I’m delighted to report that he agreed. Although he has talked about this briefly on other occasions, this will be the first time that he will focus on this story, tell it in detail, and allow me to examine the key turning points that have made the real difference in transforming his life.

Most discussions of new scientific information compartmentalize it in the domain of the “It” — factual, objective, information. But an integral understanding of reality sees clearly that this is a Four-Quadrant affair — in which the “I”, the “We” and the “It” are inseparably interconnected. Bruce is a beautiful living embodiment of this principle, and I’m excited to explore it with him.

So I invite you to join us and listen in, and perhaps ask your own questions. Bruce and I will be talking at a special time, on Thursday, July 24th. May it be an opportunity for us all to “walk our talk” with new power and authenticity!

About Bruce Lipton

Bruce H. Lipton, Ph.D., cell biologist and lecturer, is an internationally recognized leader in bridging science and spirit. Bruce was on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin’s School of Medicine and later performed groundbreaking stem cell research at Stanford University. He is the bestselling author of The Biology of Belief, The Honeymoon Effect, and co-author with Steve Bhaerman of Spontaneous Evolution. Bruce received the 2009 prestigious Goi Peace Award (Japan) in honor of his scientific contribution to world harmony.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Thursday, July 24th at 5:00pm Pacific; 6:00pm Mountain; 7:00pm Central; 8:00pm Eastern 

*Find Your Local Time

Please Note: There will be a limited number of lines available on the live conference call, so we encourage you to listen online if possible. To make sure you can get through by phone, we encourage you to dial in early.

ACCESS INSTRUCTIONS

Join the Dialogue: About one hour into the dialogue, we’ll open up the lines and you’ll have the opportunity to interact with us directly over the phone or via instant message. Here’s what to do:

To interact live by voice, dial into the conference line number and wait until we ask for a question from someone in your region, or

Send us your question via instant message in the teleseminar window on your computer

Send us your questions and comments before or during the live dialogue by posting them on our Beyond Awakening Community Facebook page

We look forward to your attendance!

Sincerely,
The Beyond Awakening Team

The Psycho-Physics of Love and Hope: Ervin Laszlo’s Radical Take on Deep Entanglement

by Terry Patten

Last Sunday, I was joined by the internationally-renowned scientist, philosopher and visionary, Ervin Laszlo for a public conversation we titled “The Self-Actualizing Cosmos: The Akasha Revolution in Science and Human Consciousness.”

The conversation ranged quite widely, and some of what he had to say even startled me.

I wasn’t surprised when he began by describing his synthesis of the radical holographic implications of the new physics, a paradigm for which he borrows the Sanskrit term “Akasha” to refer to the quantum vacuum, or originating field that is more fundamental even than matter and energy.

He described a new paradigm “that says there is no such thing as empty space, it’s more like what Buddhists speak about—a still, space that is empty but contains everything.”

Ervin says that the cosmic field is a plenum and not a vacuum. And that plenum is the code of how the universe plays out. The blueprint exists, beyond the superficial elements that we perceive. Down deeper, we find that we are part of a deeper reality where all things coexist and co-evolve.

Ervin pointed out that if you ask a quantum scientist “What is the basis of all this? What is matter?” He’ll say…there is no such thing as matter! What you have is energy, based on information moving. David Bohm talked about how the world that you observe is being in-formed. It’s fundamentally information. Instead of bits of matter rushing about, you have a total field that has no gaps, no places where it isn’t present. All information is given at the same time.

Ervin described how the new concept that is arising now in quantum cosmology/field theory is that of a holographic universe. Spacetime is holographic. In a hologram, all of the information that produces the image is present at every tiny point—you can take a holographic film and illuminate any small part of it, and you’ll find that the total image emerges. The “software” of the universe is present in every bit of it.

“You don’t see the quanta,” he explained.”You see the effects. Like with an electromagnetic field—you don’t see the field itself, you see its effect. The universe is basically an unobserved wholeness of which the observed elements are those that meet the 5 senses. We try to understand the whole, but we’re working by inference.”

It’s a profound, liberating, and radically holistic vision of the nature of our reality and our existence. But I had anticipated that.

And I had expected to challenge him, to ask him why he spoke so consistently of “consciousness” but not of “God” or “spirituality” even though the implications of his vision of reality are, in most people’s view, profoundly spiritual. But what was startling to me, was that I didn’t need to challenge him at all! He went straight to the spiritual aspect on his own.

He said what he’s talking about is really not any different from the classical spiritual notions. Plato pointed to this way of understanding reality in the allegory of the cave. Most people believe the shadows are real, but the real world is actually behind them. They have to turn around, to get “enlightened” to be able to see the real world.

Also he freely associated his notion of Akasha, the deepest dimension from which all manifest reality arises with ancient mystical concepts dating back 5000 years or more. He cited Pythagoras and Plotinus, drawing parallels with this view of reality which expresses an ancient notion. The world is not what you see—what you see is the effect of unseen realities that are the real nature of the world.

However, this ancient concept seems revolutionary now, because it’s linked to new scientific data, and thus represents a new paradigm, rooted in ancient understandings, that’s in the process of replacing the current dominant paradigm.

The conversation ranged quite widely, with a particularly interesting description by Ervin into his own practice of using intuition, of tapping into this “Akashic information field” as an aspect of his daily life. He said that he’s always been guided by intuition, and the idea that what he can perceive is only a fleeting image. Underneath is something more profound and real.

He also testified to his own “inverse optimism.” He said that he’s very optimistic in terms of human potential, but quite pessimistic in terms of the current holding pattern of the dominant paradigm. He thinks the break is about to come and that we had better be prepared for it.

But when I asked him what he meant about being prepared, he explained that he wasn’t pointing to storing food and water and guns. He talked about discovering a more healthy way to be before this break. He talked about opening ourselves up to a source of wisdom in the cosmos that can enable us to feel what is needed.

I pressed him further, and he immediately used the “L-word”.

Ervin said, “Love is the connection that we feel to others. Community. Nature. Humanity. Our connection to the cosmos itself. We know this directly whenever we can feel belonging-ness, in a Win/Win way, wherever I can recognize the deep truth that I am the other. This expresses the concept from contemporary physics of “entanglement”, which is a quantum phenomenon. All atoms, all cells are connected, deeply.”

Love, according to Ervin, is at its root recognition, knowing that we are one. It is a spiritual concept that is backed by the latest insights into how systems operate and evolve. The biosphere is such a complex system, with so many physical and non-physical dimensions—emotional, conscious, subconscious elements feelings, rationality, etc. The ultimate element is this sense of my belonging to you and to us. There is no singular sense where we can talk about evolution as if we operated on our own, independently. There is only coevolution, co-development. We and Us—that’s the source of the greatest hope we have.

The new paradigm recognizes that we are all part of one system. With higher consciousness we find ourselves more at home, and we find better and better solutions to our problems, large and small. But the old conception of world is still pervasive. We see it all around us. And it is pushing back. What price will we have to pay to transform?

Our best bet is just to transform ourselves and act according to this new paradigm, of information, of entanglement, expressed by love and oneness.

Ultimately Ervin expressed tremendous confidence, “If you can act like that [from Love] the world will be saved from ultimate collapse.”

There was much more, so I hope you will tune in to listen to this illuminating, powerful dialogue. Tip: Because he was calling in from Italy, Ervin’s voice is a bit faint; if you use earbuds or headphones, you should be able to hear him clearly. You can download the recording here.

This Sunday—The Self-Actualizing Cosmos: The Akasha Revolution in Science and Human Consciousness with Ervin Laszlo

by Terry Patten

On Sunday, July 6th, at 10am Pacific, I’ll be joined by the world-famous philosopher of science Ervin Laszlo, for a dialogue entitled “The Self-Actualizing Cosmos: The Akasha Revolution in Science and Human Consciousness.”

Terry with Ervin LaszloI’ve followed Ervin’s work for many years, but we met only recently at the first ever Integral European Conference where he gave a brilliant keynote speech, “Integral Consciousness in a Self Actualizing Cosmos.”

Ervin Laszlo’s work in recent years has centered on the formulation and development of what he has called the “Akasha Paradigm.” Akasha is the Sanskrit term for “conscious dynamic space” and he uses this term to indicate the radical nature of reality—the “quantum vacuum” or fundamental energy and information-carrying field that generates and informs the whole universe, beyond time and space.

Professor Laszlo is widely admired and credited with integrating new findings emerging at the forefront of the contemporary sciences into a radically new conception of reality, cosmos, life and consciousness. According to him, there is a major revolution under way in science today,. It changes our view of the world, and our concept of life and consciousness in the world.

It comes at a propitious time. We know that the world we have created is unsustainable: we need new thinking to avert a collapse and set us on course for a sustainable and thriving society.

We often look to science. According to Ervin, inspiration for a whole new way of thinking can indeed come from science—but not, or not only, from science as a source of new technologies. Rather, we need to view science as a source of guidance as to the nature of reality, as a wellspring of trustworthy ideas for rediscovering our relations to each other and the universe. The revolution under way in science, according to Ervin Laszlo, offers a paradigm that can fill this need.

He points out that this new paradigm has meaning and interest well beyond science. It provides a holistic, integral view of consciousness, life and the universe. He believes it can lift these integrative vistas from the realm of speculation into the domain of careful observation and rigorous reasoning. Although based on sophisticated theories and wide-ranging observations, the now emerging paradigm is basically simple and inherently meaningful.

On Sunday, we will be discussing the principal elements of this new paradigm and what it means for our lives and future, and our world in crisis.

I hope you’ll join us!

About Ervin Laszlo:

Dr. Ervin Laszlo is generally recognized as the founder of systems philosophy and general evolution theory. He serves as President of the Club of Budapest, Chairman of the Ervin Laszlo Center for Advanced Study, Chancellor of the Giordano Bruno New-Paradigm University, and Editor of World Futures: The Journal of New Paradigm Research.

His appointments have included research grants at Yale and Princeton Universities, professorships for philosophy, systems sciences, and future sciences at the Universities of Houston, Portland State, and Indiana, as well as Northwestern University and the State University of New York. In addition, he worked as program director for the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR).

Twice nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize (2004, 2005), he was awarded the Goi Peace prize (2001). He has authored more than 70 books, which have been translated into twenty languages, and has published in excess of four hundred articles and research papers, including six volumes of piano recordings.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Sunday, July 6th at 10:00am Pacific; 11:00am Mountain; 12:00pm Central; 1:00pm Eastern 

*Find Your Local Time

Please Note: There will be a limited number of lines available on the live conference call, so we encourage you to listen online if possible. To make sure you can get through by phone, we encourage you to dial in early.

ACCESS INSTRUCTIONS

Join the Dialogue: About one hour into the dialogue, we’ll open up the lines and you’ll have the opportunity to interact with us directly over the phone or via instant message. Here’s what to do:

To interact live by voice, dial into the conference line number and wait until we ask for a question from someone in your region, or

Send us your question via instant message in the teleseminar window on your computer

Send us your questions and comments before or during the live dialogue by posting them on our Beyond Awakening Community Facebook page

We look forward to your attendance!

Sincerely,
The Beyond Awakening Team

Contemplative Practice and Rewiring the Heart-Brain

by Terry Patten

CynthiaLast Sunday, I was joined by the great contemporary Christian mystic and teacher, Cynthia Bourgeault for “The Eye of the Needle and the Cave of the Heart: Cultivating a Pure and Single Heart in a World Stuffed Full of Way-Too-Muchness”.

Cynthia was, as always, spiritually dynamic and soulfully riveting. She expresses such intense clarity, and so much spiritual depth and intellectual vigor that talking with her is consistently uplifting and catalytic.

Cynthia Bourgeault embraces many paradoxes. She can rightfully be called a pandit, as she is both a scholar and practitioner, integrating actual realization with deep scholarship. And although she is a serious contemplative and hermit, she can also be called an activist who makes a powerful positive difference in the lives of thousands of people all over the world. She also advocates for the riches of the Christian tradition while being a fierce constructive critic of so much that no longer works in Christian churches and communities. And she also embraces non-Christian sources of learning and contemplative practice—in this interview she referred especially to Sufi practices, and her last book, The Holy Trinity and the Law of Three is based on principles she learned studying the Gurdjieff work. And Cynthia is also, with me, a creative participant in the evolution of a truly integral spirituality, informed by Ken Wilber’s important theoretical maps.

Contemplative practice, though, is the cornerstone of Cynthia’s work, so I began by asking her to give listeners a sense of what it means to be a contemplative in today’s world, a “world stuffed full of way-too-muchness.”

Cynthia distinguished two meanings of the word “contemplative”, referring to the “outer” and the “inner” forms. Most people equate the contemplative life with a lifestyle adopted by hermits and monastics, one characterized by silence and continuous prayer, unplugged from everyday society and popular culture. But for her, the essence of contemplative practice is the internal rewiring and reconfiguration of how the brain-heart actually makes connections and sees the world.

In this “inner” contemplative practice, we learn to cultivate witness presence, which ultimately transforms consciousness, allowing us to see “from the whole to the parts” instead of being caught up in a fragmented consciousness that needs to reassemble the parts in order to intuit the prior wholeness. Once this process is really underway then internal and external silence are far less important. The value of external silence is primarily as part of the process of pulling the plug on the usual “small self” evasions.

I asked Cynthia how this description related to Ken Wilber’s distinction between higher “states” and higher “stages” of consciousness. It seemed to me that inner contemplative cultivation opens up higher states of consciousness (e.g., witness consciousness) and also a growth into higher structures or stages of consciousness (how one thinks).

Cynthia agreed, using a simple, memorable “one-liner”: a state is a place you go to, and a stage is a place you come from. She then focused on what we can actually practice and experience, which is “putting the mind in the heart”. And this is not just a metaphor! We are literally entraining the brain to the vibration of the heart, which allows for the emergence of a perceptional field that apprehends from wholeness.

For both Cynthia and me, the consideration of practice itself has recently been generating the most energy and passion. I asked her to reflect on this consideration of practice and the obstacles or the landmarks along the path that she was noticing as people find their way into this kind of contemplative life.

The people most often drawn to her teaching are either what she calls “active Christians” or “heart-broken Christians”. Typically, the active Christians lack any sense of witnessing consciousness because Christianity by and large honors the egoic self, which will eventually go to heaven and continue to live its egoic life. So the practice (and challenge) with them is to begin to work with spiritual attentiveness at a deeper place, so they can actually taste what that is.

The heart-broken Christians fled Christianity years ago because they couldn’t find the “living water”. Often they have cultivated other deep spiritual practices, but there is something in them that is longing to come home to Christianity. Their challenge is that they often don’t experientially understand devotion, or 2nd-person spirituality (an “I-thou” relationship to God) and they tend to be seekers, preoccupied with becoming “enlightened.” Without an understanding that the work is in the care of your own heart, this striving becomes spiritual materialism and the collecting of experiences and teachers. And it can even bring great suffering.

I recalled that the great Mahamudra teacher, Dan Brown, speaks about the Tibetan Dzogchen instruction to recognize the inner essence of all experience, and thus to relax “out-there-ness”. This is possible when one understands that consciousness is what gives rise to what is perceived as the outside world. It is usually assumed that a period of purification (extended meditation, retreats, contemplation) is necessary in order to begin to develop a sense of this deep interiority.

Cynthia acknowledged the necessity of purification, but emphasized that it doesn’t have to start there, or to take years. She’s often seen people have powerful breakthroughs after only a single day of practicing centering prayer. And after you’ve had even a momentary taste of God consciousness, purification naturally follows. It is simply the life path that most beautifully syncs up with what already exists within you. Cynthia beautifully said, there is no human being who doesn’t come from the inside of the heart of what it’s all about. This is our natural condition, so we can’t possibly fall out of it or start from a place of separation!

I mentioned my recent exploration of Integral Soul Work (although I use the term “soul” somewhat differently, it’s more like what she calls the “heart” and the “heart of the heart”.) I’ve been opening even more fully into my primary practice, relaxing as awareness itself. But in many moments life is arising in a way that offers me the opportunity to listen with the ear of the heart to the very specific, particular call of my soul that is drawing me toward my most important personal life choices. I mentioned that frequently high non-dual meditation instructions are interpreted rather rigidly so as to suppress our healthy intuition of our next steps in the unfolding of our soul’s life.

Cynthia responded by pointing out that she sees a gap between the spiritual and developmental maps we use to describe our experience and our actual experience of life. In her experience, consciousness is an umbilical cord between the finite and the infinite and who “I” am is a range of conditions from the most compacted neurotic, to a freer spacious healthy ego, to a higher witness presence.

Cynthia then shared a beautiful practice that she uses to tune in and make wise, non-reactive choices about her life. When she is clear about the question or choice she needs to make, she draws four columns on paper representing four conditions or “voices” of her being. She’ll then listen deeply to each voice, listening with her body as well, and write down the answers she hears from each perspective.

Cynthia listed these four aspects as:

The Nafs: this voice is distinguished by frenzied, automatic grasping. In the body, it feels like contraction with tones of anger and rage.

The Soul: by which she means “the healthy ego”. Tuning in to this aspect relaxes the body. This is your most spacious personal finite identity.

The Spirit: this state becomes accessible in such quiet and ordered states as just after meditation, when there is often a clarity of knowingness.

The Heart: you can access this voice by shifting attention to the region of the physical heart and also into the heart’s holographic mode of perceiving reality. You can learn to discern this voice by just resting attention in the heart and listening to how the heart speaks. In a way, she says, the Heart is the voice between Spirit and Soul.

Cynthia recounted consulting with all these voices, each in turn, in the process of finally deciding to give up a house she had rented for years in Colorado. For her, the process can be hilarious and wonderful!

As long as I’ve known her, Cynthia has always been on the edge of what is emerging, so I asked her about what’s emerging right now. She is working with exploring the “liminal spaces”, or the spaces in between the realms of consciousness, such as the time between crucifixion and resurrection, the traditional times of fasting and contemplation in the Christian calendar.

Nonetheless, her foundational practice continues to be Centering Prayer, as taught by Father Thomas Keating. She defines Centering Prayer simply—when you catch yourself thinking, let the thought go. And “thought” is anything that draws your attention to a single point. By letting go of the objects of attention, you naturally experience objectless awareness, even if it’s only for a nanosecond. Incrementally, this non-constricted attitude brings about a capacity to rest in the Cave of the Heart and to begin to see what the heart sees, which gets at the deeper meaning of the phrase, “Blessed are the pure of heart, for they shall see God.”

There was much more—including penetrating answers to some excellent questions from listeners.

I hope you will tune in to listen to this illuminating, powerful dialogue. You can download the recording here.

The Eye of the Needle and the Cave of the Heart: Cultivating a Pure and Single Heart in a World Stuffed Full of Way-Too-Muchness with Cynthia Bourgeault

by Terry Patten

CynthiaIt is a true delight to converse sacredly with the authentic and illuminated heart-mind of an uncommonly deep and intelligent mystic, and Cynthia Bourgeault is certainly such a being . So I’m honored and quietly excited that I will be joined on Sunday, June 15th at 10am Pacific by the great contemporary Christian mystic and teacher, Cynthia Bourgeault for a conversation entitled “The Eye of the Needle and the Cave of the Heart: Cultivating a Pure and Single Heart in a World Stuffed Full of Way-Too-Muchness”.

When Cynthia and I spoke in preparation for our dialogue, exploring what recently has held our deepest attention, we quickly discovered that for both of us, our energy and passion was coming most alive in the consideration of practice itself.

Contemporary conversations about spiritual practice sometimes seem to oversimplify things — as if “quieting the mind” were a mechanical procedure to perform in ten minutes.

Cynthia is right now interested in deeper, subtler work, in which she and her students repeatedly plunge into depth, via mediation, contemplation, chanting, reading, silence, oral teaching…and more meditation. It is the cumulative force of this, when people have the great blessing to really “hunker down” in retreat together, that gets the mind and the heart quieted, attentive, and more profoundly receptive.

Cynthia and I talked about this deep process of mystical “emptying” when I spoke to her before. She uses the ancient Christian term “kenosis” to indicate the radical stillness at the depth of authentic mystical experience.

This is about a discovery not just of “sincerity” as if it were something that is either there or not there, but of more and more profound sincerity, the process and discipline of the patient, consistent deepening receptivity and thus transformation of the “small self”.

This level of devotion to practice generally requires a profound intuition of a higher possibility, a deep honoring of what the heart can do when it rests, deeply, finding its way to the silence that is always here, waiting beneath all the noises and distractions of our busy life. In that silence the heart can know its truth, its deepest truth, and cease to be distracted, becoming truly single.

When our heart is purified enough that it can relax in its own deep sincerity, it naturally knows and respects and loves its deepest and highest potentials, which are not about anything glorious, but more about our most humble and open-hearted trusting simplicity. This kind of depth and tenderness and softness is one of the main things in life that are truly worth talking about!

Our conversation promises to be an exploration and celebration of the essence of practice, the deep sincerity of the heart, and a deep sense of the what the heart can do when it’s single.

The Sufi practice of sohbet means speaking to and from “the heart of the heart”. I invite you to bring your heart and listen in on Sunday, as Cynthia Bourgeault and I speak to and from the heart of our hearts.

About Cynthia Bourgeault

Modern day mystic, Episcopal priest, writer, and internationally known retreat leader, Cynthia Bourgeault divides her time between solitude at her seaside hermitage in Maine, and a demanding schedule traveling globally to teach and spread the recovery of the Christian contemplative and Wisdom path. She is the founding Director of both The Contemplative Society and the Aspen Wisdom School.

Cynthia is the author of eight books: The Holy Trinity and the Law of ThreeThe Meaning of Mary Magdalene, The Wisdom Jesus, Centering Prayer and Inner Awakening, Mystical Hope, The Wisdom Way of Knowing, Chanting the Psalms, and Love is Stronger Than Death. She has also authored or contributed to numerous articles and courses on the Christian spiritual life. She is a past Fellow of the Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural research at St. John’s Abbey in Collegeville, MN, and an oblate of New Camaldoli Monastery in Big Sur, California.

Cynthia continues to contribute to The Contemplative Society in her role as Principal Teacher and advisor. She passionately promotes the practice of Centering Prayer, and has worked closely with Thomas Keating, Bruno Barnhart, Richard Rohr, as well as many other contemplative teachers and leaders within the Christian tradition as well as other spiritual paths.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Sunday, June 15th at 10:00am Pacific; 11:00am Mountain; 12:00pm Central; 1:00pm Eastern 

*Find Your Local Time

Please Note: There will be a limited number of lines available on the live conference call, so we encourage you to listen online if possible. To make sure you can get through by phone, we encourage you to dial in early.

ACCESS INSTRUCTIONS

Join the Dialogue: About one hour into the dialogue, we’ll open up the lines and you’ll have the opportunity to interact with us directly over the phone or via instant message. Here’s what to do:

To interact live by voice, dial into the conference line number and wait until we ask for a question from someone in your region, or

Send us your question via instant message in the teleseminar window on your computer

Send us your questions and comments before or during the live dialogue by posting them on our Beyond Awakening Community Facebook page

We look forward to your attendance!

Sincerely,
The Beyond Awakening Team