On Sunday, Andrew Harvey and Terry Patten — The Ways of Passion and Illumination

by Terry Patten

This Sunday, January 25th at 10am Pacific please join me for another conversation with the renowned mystic, scholar, poet, and activist Andrew Harvey entitled “The Ways of Passion and Illumination.”

Andrew and I have always been able to converse frankly and passionately and catalytically. And yet over the last year our practice of “sacred conversation” has begun to venture more and more boldly, wildly, and fruitfully into edgy unknown territory. We’ve been ecstatically “riding the wave” of what is organically emerging in the moment, allowing it to guide us. This is why we decided to start recording these conversations, and even to soon begin to teach together.

This latest recording is in part an exploration of the true nature of Love. I shared with Andrew my belief that the task of our lifetime is to grow in our capacity to love. Love is the sternest master and asks everything of us. This apprenticeship is never going to end, but paradoxically this makes me feel incredibly loved. Andrew resonated with this idea and added that we can’t begin this love affair with the Love that is creating everything and think that we’re going to remain in control or even know who we are by the end of the love affair. An essential surrender is what is being asked, which can be terrifying to the ego.

We also discussed the (mostly) not talked about spiritual controversy between the ecstatic mystery teachings of intense spiritual feeling, passion, emotion and arousal vs. the “cooler” nondual and mindfulness approaches. Unhealthy expressions of the cooler practices can be disembodied, operating out of a kind of transcendent arrogance. While the “hotter” expressions out of balance can spill over into florid emotionalism. We both agreed that a tremendous opportunity exists in recognizing that these schools are “not two.” In fact, this reconciliation could be the key to addressing our world in crisis—compassion and agency united in sacred activism.

We spoke about our own practices and our latest insights, and what is becoming available in our teaching. It’s no longer about the traditional exchange of wisdom or knowledge between teacher and student. A whole new model is emerging. We’ll be feeling into this new model at the March events that we’ll be co-leading. Andrew captured our vision for this gathering beautifully, reflecting that the teaching that is needed at this moment is not about sharing information; it’s about living the experience together to inspire each other. Profoundly liberating transformation is not merely subjective; it is enacted in relationship, and ceremonially “made real” in community. You can find out more about our early March events in Northern California here.

I feel blessed to be having these conversations with Andrew and to be teaching together. There’s a wildness and a joy in our human connection as two passionate mystics and activists who feel called to convene a sacred, ceremonial ritual at this time and in this space.

I hope you’ll listen in. You can follow along with Andrew’s gorgeous recitation of the Rumi poem below my signature, which he says exemplifies the prime power of love as the way of illumination and knowing.

To our evolution,

Terry

Love does not live in science and learning,

Or in any careful order of pages and letters.

Whatever people chatter about is not the way of lovers.

The branches of love are in pre-eternity

And its roots in the post eternal.

This is a tree that does not exist on any support

Of heaven or earth.

We have dethroned reason

And imprisoned desire.

For the majesty of divine love cannot live

With such fools and their habits.

 

So long as you hunger after anything

What you long for will be an idol.

When love decides to love you back

You will not longer exist.

Old sailors totter on planks of fear and hope

But when planks and sailor have vanished

What remains but drowning?

Shams-i-Tabrīzī you are sea and pearl

The mystery of your being is the secret of the Creator.

My soul, the first time I saw you

My soul heard wonders from your soul

And when my heart drank water from your fountain

It drowned in you

And the river swept me away.

– Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī

Tr. Andrew Harvey

Andrew Harvey is an author, speaker and founder/director of the Institute of Sacred Activism, an international organization focused on inviting concerned people to take up the challenge of our contemporary global crises by becoming inspired, effective and practical agents of institutional and systemic change, in order to create peace and sustainability.

He was born in south India in 1952 where he lived until he was nine years old. At the age of 21, at Oxford University he became the youngest person ever to be awarded a fellowship to All Soul’s College, England’s highest academic honor. He became disillusioned with life there and returned to his native India, where a series of mystical experiences initiated his spiritual journey.

Over the next thirty years he plunged into different mystical traditions to learn their secrets and practices, including deep extended study and practice of Hinduism, and Tibetan Buddhist practice. He collaborated with Sogyal Rinpoche in writing the classic Tibetan Book of Living and Dying. He did deep study of Rumi and Sufi mysticism, and produced what are in my opinion some of the most magnificent and luminous translations of Rumi’s poetry.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Sunday, January 25th at 10:00am Pacific; 11:00am Mountain; 12:00pm Central; 1:00pm Eastern

*Find Your Local Time

Please Note: There will be a limited number of lines available on the live conference call, so we encourage you to listen online if possible. To make sure you can get through by phone, we encourage you to dial in early.

ACCESS INSTRUCTIONS

  • To listen live by phone, dial: 425-440-5100  (alternate #: 501-707-0312)
  • Then, enter Access Code: 272072#
  • To listen live online go to: TO BE ANNOUNCED
  • To download the audio after the teleseminar is complete go to the Beyond Awakening Audio Page

Sincerely,

The Beyond Awakening Team

 

Integral Islam — An Inside View

by Terry Patten

Last Sunday, I was joined by Amir Ahmad Nasr for a conversation we entitled “The Birth Pangs of an Integral Islam.” It was an extraordinary conversation in that it provided the unique opportunity to get an “inside” view of one man’s journey to an Integral Islam. I think you’ll be inspired to hear Amir’s sober but fierce optimism about the evolution of consciousness in the Muslim world.

Amir is the formerly anonymous Arab Spring activist behind the internationally acclaimed sociopolitical blog The Sudanese Thinker, which inspired the rise of the Sudanese digital activism scene. When he was 26, Amir’s first book was released, the memoir My Isl@m: How Fundamentalism Stole My Mind – And Doubt Freed My Soul. It was subsequently banned in Sudan and Malaysia which forced him to seek political asylum in Canada.

Amir and I have been friends for five years and, it’s been uplifting to witness his emergence onto the public stage. He is not only passionate about helping to create the conditions conducive to evolution in the Middle East and the wider Muslim world — he understands, deeply and authentically, that it’s an “Integral affair.” He is committed to the application of Integral approaches to cultural evolution in the Muslim world. He is a vivid example of Integral-in-Action.

I loved hearing Amir tell the story of the first stirrings of religious feelings during his childhood as he was moved by the beauty of the call to prayer. He gave us a glimpse of the interior experience of Muslim believers when he described the time he spent in the mosque in Qatar, memorizing passages from the Koran, and tapping into a blissful yet intensely charged sense of oneness that he knew was real.

And his description of a kind of “mental child abuse” at the hands of a fundamentalist imam was searing. It gave me insight into the psychology of unhealthy fundamentalism, and how it is inculcated in young boys.

But as much as I wanted listeners to hear Amir tell the story of his own journey of spiritual awakening, I knew we needed to begin by addressing the elephant in the room. Islam, more and more, has been in the headlines for all the wrong reasons.

Is there something inherently violent about Islam? Amir pointed out that the Arabic word “Islam” means “surrender” or “peace.” That “surrender” can be interpreted in a healthy, transcendent way, as transcending one’s ego and “surrendering from the heart.” But Islam emerged in a politically charged “red” warrior culture. In such a world, the role of religion is to enable people to defer personal gratification and conform to harmonious social behaviors. So in the fundamentalist Islamic world, this teaching of “surrender” is often interpreted as blind “submission” to authority. Amir argued that we need to differentiate Muhammad in his role as a religious leader from his roles as a political and a military leader in a warrior culture. If he’s viewed in a way that fuses those spheres, there will always be problems.

Amir still sees a great deal of beauty in the esoteric spiritual essence of Islam, even though its exoteric religious structures often suppress human rights. Because it’s rooted in the transition from warrior (Red) culture to traditional (Blue or Amber) culture, Islam tends to have a contentious relationship with the modern world. But while the “cultural fault line” of Islam does tend to be illiberal, there are many degrees of this that differ widely across the Muslim world.

Amir suggested that Islam is evolving in people’s hearts, privately and internally, behind closed doors. He described two little-known positive developments that are signs of dramatic shifts in consciousness in the Arab and Muslim worlds:

The changing media landscape—starting with the introduction of the Internet and cable TV and the advent of social media activism. The availability of cheap smart phones in the Middle East and North Africa has had huge ramifications. The first wave was the Arab Spring, but that’s only the first wave.

A major demographic shift— the Arab world is experience a huge “youth bulge.” As many as 60% of Arab populations are young people. And Muslims in their late teens to early 20s are much less conservative and traditional in their thinking than their parents.

According to Amir, this is why we should be excited: statistically, the highest rate of consumption per capita of YouTube videos in the entire world is in Saudi Arabia. Who’s doing all that viewing? Young women watching educational videos.

Also, of the top 10 YouTube channels in Saudi Arabia,  7 are comedy shows that subtly, but daringly challenge religious and political doctrine. These shows are produced by young people from their homes and have grown into massive media platforms. And many of these youth point to Jon Stewart of the Daily Show as their inspiration!

Amir says that the things being discussed on Twitter in Saudi Arabia today were unthinkable five years ago. But political change has not happened yet. After all, the older generations are still in power, and don’t forget, flogging and imprisonment are still enforcing the status quo. But there is a true shift in consciousness happening across the Arab world, in Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, and Tunisia.

(Amir recommends reading this article on cultural change and this book on the new entrepreneurs of the Middle East for anyone seeking more insight into the major cultural changes taking place. And Amir’s friend Ahmed Al-Omran describes the changes happening in Saudi Arabia in his Oslo Freedom Forum talk here. )

The most dynamic part of the dialogue, in my opinion, was Amir’s personal story. After being convinced, while still an impressionable youth, that his intelligent questions were really the voice of Satan, he spent most of his youth, struggling to suppress his curiosity. This was a kind of child abuse, leaving him terrified that his intellectual and spiritual vitality might condemn him to the horrors of hell. Amir painted a vivid picture of the pain he endured while living with that intense cognitive dissonance.

Even after his family moved to Malaysia and he started to attend a liberal, modern international British high school, and gained access to a bigger intellectual world, he continued to sweep his doubt under the rug in the hopes that it would disappear.

It was only once he attended university that his real transformation began. What opened the door was simple — the free exchange of information with people he could relate to. He stumbled upon an anonymous blogger called “The Big Pharaoh” who wrote about God, sex, and human rights—a kindred spirit, a free thinker. Amir “became obsessed.” Here was a place where all of the questions he’d been told to ignore were being discussed openly! He began to explore the liberal Arab blogosphere and follow other Arab bloggers. He encountered the saying “I disagree with what you say, but I’ll fight to the death for your right to say it,” and it became his personal rallying cry. The Big Pharaoh encouraged Amir to blog about his personal experience and his questions about faith and he became the first significant blogger from Sudan with The Sudanese Thinker.

I invite you to listen in to this timely and eye-opening conversation. You’ll hear about Amir’s development from atheism, to agnosticism, to trans-rational spirituality; and how Ken Wilber’s Marriage of Sense and Soul enabled him to make sense of it all. Get a front row seat to the birth of a truly Integral Islam. You can listen in here.

 

 

This Sunday — The Birth Pangs of an Integral Islam — with Amir A. Nasr

by Terry Patten

This Sunday, Jan. 11th at 10am Pacific, I will be joined by Amir A. Nasr for a conversation we’ve titled “The Birth Pangs of an Integral Islam.”

Amir is the author of the searing memoir and banned book My Isl@m: How Fundamentalism Stole My Mind – And Doubt Freed My Soul, which forced him to seek, and thankfully attain, political asylum in Canada.

The book was recommended by Foreign Policy magazine among 25 books to read in 2013, and was praised by Ken Wilber as “an important and significant book, especially at this time in our history,” and “the right message, at the right time, from the right person.”

Amir is that rarest of souls — a young man who has already lived, and is living, the path of development of a truly Integral Islamic identity, one that has taken him from Khartoum to Qatar to Malaysia to Cyberspace to the Arab Spring and eventually to Vancouver, Canada. It has also taken him from fundamentalism to atheism and back to a transformed affirmation of an Integral Islam.

As you likely remember, in early 2011, the entire world watched in awe as the Arab Spring burst onto the scene, bringing huge, defiant, and mostly non-violent masses of people onto the streets demanding “bread, freedom, dignity, and social justice.” It was an optimistic moment in history, in which we were treated to many inspiring news reports focused on young, educated, tech-savvy, and relatively progressive youth who rallied their fellow citizens during the early phases of the uprisings.

But over time and with more recent headlines, that all seems to have changed… or has it?

From the rise and fall of the Muslim Brotherhood, to the rise of ISIS and the controversial debate on Bill Maher’s show that featured Ben Afleck and Sam Harris, a lot has happened. As a result, much has been written about the role of various manifestations of Islam in public life in the Muslim world, its relationship with the West, and its alleged incompatibility with liberalism.

Missing from the conversation however is a more crucial discussion about the evolution of consciousness and spirituality in the Arab and wider Muslim world, among Islam’s 1.5 billion adherent. Is there something potently positive and exciting happening in that domain of inquiry that isn’t being reported?

Amir answers with a resounding “yes!” He says that beyond the sociopolitical news headlines, among large segments of urbanized Muslim populations with access to the Internet, the birth-pangs of an implicitly integral Islam are loud and clear.

I’m excited to explore the contours of that Integral Islam in our conversation this Sunday. Please join us!

About Amir Ahmad Nasr

Described by The Economist as “puckish” (aka playfully mischievous), Amir A. Nasr is the formerly anonymous provocative voice and Arab Spring activist behind the internationally acclaimed sociopolitical blog The Sudanese Thinker, infamously credited with helping to inspire the rise of the Sudanese digital activism scene.

In 2013, at the age of 26, Amir made his authorial debut with his memoir My Isl@m: How Fundamentalism Stole My Mind – And Doubt Freed My Soul, which forced him to seek political asylum in Canada. The book was recommended by Foreign Policy among 25 books to read in 2013, alongside books by Pulitzer Prize winners and former diplomat and military personalities. From its explorations of the root causes of fundamentalism to its assessment of the New Atheists including Sam Harris, the book tackles a wide range of pertinent issues that continue to dominate the headlines.

As a result of his decade-long work at the intersection of culture, digital media, and current affairs, Amir has shared the stage with Nobel Peace Laureates, former presidents, and fellow entrepreneurs, and was highlighted by WIRED as a “formidable speaker.” He’s been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, The Guardian, Bloomberg, France24, Al Jazeera English, CBC, WNYC, and many more media outlets in over 12 languages across the globe. Amir is passionate about accelerating the prospects of reform in the Middle East, and the wider Muslim world, and believes that the application of integral tools and practices wields great potential in aiding this objective.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Sunday, January 11th at 10:00am Pacific; 11:00am Mountain; 12:00pm Central; 1:00pm Eastern

*Find Your Local Time

Please Note: There will be a limited number of lines available on the live conference call, so we encourage you to listen online if possible. To make sure you can get through by phone, we encourage you to dial in early.

ACCESS INSTRUCTIONS

  • To listen live by phone, dial: 425-440-5100  (alternate #: 501-707-0312)
  • Then, enter Access Code: 272072#
  • To listen live online go to: http://instantteleseminar.com/?eventid=63935391
  • To download the audio after the teleseminar is complete go to the Beyond Awakening Audio Page

Join the Dialogue: About one hour into the dialogue, we’ll open up the lines and you’ll have the opportunity to interact with us directly over the phone or via instant message. Here’s what to do:

To interact live by voice, dial into the conference line number and wait until we ask for a question from someone in your region, or

Send us your question via instant message in the teleseminar window on your computer

Send us your questions and comments before or during the live dialogue by posting them on our Beyond Awakening Community Facebook page

We look forward to your attendance!

Sincerely,
The Beyond Awakening Team

No Really—Change DOES Begin with You

by Terry Patten

Witt19rcLast Sunday, I was joined by Integral clinical psychologist, teacher, author, and commentator Keith Witt for a dialogue entitled, “We Are the Catastrophe, We Are the Salvation.”

There’s much that I appreciate about Keith Witt—the combination of his wide-ranging intelligence with his empathic warmth; his extensive knowledge of developmental and evolutionary psychology and the insights these disciplines shine on the everyday issues of human relationships; and his skillful use of Integral theory to contextualize and expand on the implications of those insights— always in a fun, bright, and spontaneous way that makes a real human connection to whomever he’s with. (And he’s conducted an astonishing fifty-three thousand therapy sessions!)

I wanted to dialogue with Keith about the fundamental tension that underlies the whole premise of Beyond Awakening having to do with imperfect humans asking the big questions about how we can “be the change” that truly addresses our world crisis. Over the years, listeners have asked me serious, thoughtful questions on this theme: Don’t we need to first clean up our own acts? Isn’t self-change foundational to humanity’s transformational “sea change”?

Others point out that if we step aside to focus on ourselves, we risk abandoning the public sphere to people who lack the integrity to begin with the personal work. I often think of the song from the musical Hair with the lyrics: How can people be so heartless? How can people be so cruel? It’s easy to be hard, which is a reference to the archetype of the social activist who is a jerk.

And yet, if we cleave only to the therapeutic agenda, which is of necessity self-involved, we risk detracting from the energy available for relationship and civic engagement. I think that we need to do the personal work but not stop at the personal work. We also need to do the interpersonal work where we rise into a field of love and care together, but also press into the edges of what is possible and evolve the “We” field, so that we are actively being evolution in action in all the quadrants. That’s my agenda with this series, the “adjacent possible.”

Keith was ready to go right into this territory with me. Even though he works as a psychotherapist, he doesn’t expect that work to be the limits of how and what people engage in life. He pointed to the interface between public action and personal experience and growth, noting that we already have what we need for peace and prosperity on the planet. What’s missing, he observed, is the collective will and consciousness to enact those solutions. Integral theory implies that if you neglect your personal development on any developmental line (interpersonal, self, psycho-sexual), it will interfere with your ability to contribute your gifts to the world. In this way, psychotherapy is a crucial part of healing the world.

We also spoke about the function of shame, which I’ve explored in my own work and teaching, and the way in which it functions as the membrane of the repression barrier. Often the real shifts necessary for growth are outside of people’s consciousness because they are ashamed.

Keith says that regarding shame only in negative terms is part of the way that “we are the catastrophe.” It is one of our evolutionary drives, powered by the evolutionary impulse, and a necessary capacity for mammalian social transmission of knowledge and social structure. Keith quipped, “humans take all the drives, no matter what they are, and turn them into complex art.” The nervous system recoils from the physiological experience of shame, transmuting it into projection or denial. This can trigger acts of violence against ourselves, others, and the planet. But with awareness, shame can become a spiritual guide. Keith suggests that if you are feeling shame, it’s wise to try to find the value you’re violating; then, either refine the value or follow the implications of holding the value with integrity.

I resonated with what Keith had to say about the interface between public action and personal experience and growth, but thought it was important to bring in a challenge that has been directed at therapy in the past. I referred to the title of James Hillman’s book, We’ve Had a Hundred Years of Psychotherapy—and the World’s Getting Worse, and observed that there are systemic dynamics that are pretty retrogressive and may not be sufficiently addressed simply by one person/one heart at a time. Don’t we need to ponder these system dynamics and be active as an expression of our care, working with what we can most easily grok at the human scale; and at the same time be planetary citizens in a way that has a broader level of dynamism?

Keith agreed that the human and planetary concerns are not mutually exclusive. But he added that the more we grow and develop, the more we find ourselves wanting to contribute to these other things, and being curious about them, and about what is beautiful, good, and true.

I asked Keith to draw the big picture of what, in the end, is most important for all of us— imperfect, vulnerable human beings that we are, alive in a moment when we’re being asked a great deal, for a sea change, to turn a larger corner.

Keith’s big picture summary was “It’s all relationships, all the time.” To ourselves, to others and to the world — holarchies, all the way up and all the way down. Anytime we feel disconnected, it’s an illusion. Within that connection, we are either being true to our inner voices or not. If we’re not being true, we suffer and do violence. The more sensitive we become to these nuances of feeling – of violence, of compassion, of being true to our deepest voices, the more effective, engaged and clear we become.

Keith also shared some wonderful practices from his course “Loving Completely: Five Ways Relationships Work…or Don’t.” One practice relates to finding a romantic partner. Keith suggests that you train yourself to ask five questions whenever you feel the pull of “erotic polarity” toward someone (listen almost to the end of our interview and you’ll find out exactly what that means!)

1)    Is there erotic polarity, a spark of attraction, between me and another person?

2)    Does this person maintain their physical and psychological health?

3)    If I was in relationship with this person and there was conflict, would he or she be able and willing to do what it takes to get back to love?

4)    How does this person show up as a parent or family member?

5)    Does this person have deep soul’s purpose, and would they appreciate what’s meaningful for me?

Keith says to pay attention to whether or not these are showing up in other people. After a while, you’ll start noticing whether or not they are showing up in you. And if your assessment of your prospective partner leads to positive answers, Keith says it’s likely a healthy match. Go for it!

Keith also offered a nuanced and practical attunement exercise in which you find your way to acceptance & caring intent towards your sensations, emotions, thoughts, judgments and desires. He also offered a simple but powerful shadow practice in which you mine your daydreams for information about what lies at the edge of awareness in shadow. I invite you to listen in!

 

We Are the Catastrophe, We Are the Salvation with Keith Witt

by Terry Patten

Keith WittThis Sunday, Dec. 14th at 10am Pacific, I will be joined by Keith Witt for a conversation we’ve titled “We Are the Catastrophe, We Are the Salvation.

Keith Witt is a truly integral clinical psychologist, teacher, author, and commentator. He has a private practice, but also publicly shares his rich and unique insights into human psychology, physiology, and relationships in a series of books, online courses, talks, and in his role as a regular guest on The Daily Evolver with Jeff Salzman.

On Sunday, Keith and I will be looking at how to best foster the commitment and will needed to address humanity’s crisis and move beyond being the catastrophe to being the salvation, starting at the local level where Keith’s therapy and teaching work has mostly been—working with individuals, couples, families, and graduate/post-graduate psychotherapy students to support more love and less violence; to having influence at the global level, social level, and policy level.

Keith sees most psychotherapy and change work as operating on the local level to deepen consciousness. He says that there are critical thresholds of expanded consciousness that need to be reached for our global will to reach a tipping point where we can resolve the crises that surround us. While there have been five great extinctions since life appeared on earth, humanity is the first cause of a great extinction that has a conscience. Humanity’s collective conscience gains power as consciousness expands person-by-person, family-by-family, and group-by-group. The wealth, power, and technology to provide solutions to all the world’s most pressing problems exist already and are constantly being expanded and refined.

In our discussions leading up to this dialogue, Keith observed that “everything is relationships” within ourselves, with others, with nature, and with the past/present/future. All relationships manifest in holarchies. Keith will walk us through what fractals (where the whole is repeated on multiple levels on different time and size scales) have to do relationships and holarchies, and unpack how greater complexity in humans is biased towards deeper consciousness and increasing compassion.

Keith also says that as part of this great “extinction with a conscience” every individual human is also contributing to the salvation on some level, even if it’s only to heed the faint voices of our genetic predispositions to share, care, and be fair.  I hope you’ll tune in!

About Keith Witt

Dr. Keith Witt is a licensed psychologist, teacher, and author who has lived and worked in Santa Barbara, Ca. for over forty years. He is the founder of The School of Love, where he offers his “School of Love Lecture Series,” “Therapist in the Wild” web series, and “Integral Conversations,” a collection of audios and videos on health, love, relationships, sexuality, spirituality, and development-related topics. Integral Life recently launched an online course by Keith called “Loving Completely: Five Ways Relationships Work…or Don’t.”

Keith has written five books (Integral Mindfulness, Waking Up, Sessions, The Attuned Family, and The Gift of Shame), and given three TEDx talks. He  lectures and teaches classes across the U.S. Waking Up and its companion volume, Sessions, are two of the first texts on Integrally Informed Psychotherapy.

Keith has conducted over fifty-three thousand therapy sessions, led many groups, and been a contributor to Integral Life and the Journal of Integral Theory and Practice. In his well-received presentations at the What Next and the Integral Theory Conferences, and in his ongoing series, “The Shrink and the Pundit” with Jeff Salzman, Keith has explored love, intra and interpersonal relationships, and child and adult development from multiple perspectives, weaving neuroscience, Integral theory, wisdom traditions, and numerous forms of psychotherapy into a coherent cosmology of love and development.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Sunday, December 14th at 10:00am Pacific; 11:00am Mountain; 12:00pm Central; 1:00pm Eastern

*Find Your Local Time

Please Note: There will be a limited number of lines available on the live conference call, so we encourage you to listen online if possible. To make sure you can get through by phone, we encourage you to dial in early.

ACCESS INSTRUCTIONS

  • To listen live by phone, dial: 425-440-5100  (alternate #: 501-707-0312)
  • Then, enter Access Code: 272072#
  • To listen live online go to: http://instantteleseminar.com/?eventid=63348672
  • To download the audio after the teleseminar is complete go to the Beyond Awakening Audio Page

Join the Dialogue: About one hour into the dialogue, we’ll open up the lines and you’ll have the opportunity to interact with us directly over the phone or via instant message. Here’s what to do:

To interact live by voice, dial into the conference line number and wait until we ask for a question from someone in your region, or

Send us your question via instant message in the teleseminar window on your computer

Send us your questions and comments before or during the live dialogue by posting them on our Beyond Awakening Community Facebook page

We look forward to your attendance!

Sincerely,
The Beyond Awakening Team